Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Burglar proofing your window AC

While most of us look forward to the summer season, we occasionally need relief from the summer heat. For those people who don't have central air condition, a window air condition unit is a welcome alternative.  However, window units can make our homes more appealing to burglars and easier to break into. Below are some tips on keeping your home secure when using a window ac.

Placement: Usually we think of placing our AC where our needs inside are best suited. Before installing your unit this year, view your house from the outside. Ideally, your ac unit will be placed in a window that faces the road or other populated area. This should also be well lit. A criminal will be less likely to try and breach your home if they don't have they privacy to do so.

Window rod: When installing a window ac, the window is usually shut on the unit it self. This leaves the ability for the window to be open the rest of the way, allowing for the unit to be removed. Some units come with a metal bracket to be installed to prevent this. If your unit came with one, we advise using it. We still recommend reinforcing that concept with something stronger. A metal rod snugged from the top of the window, to the top of the window frame will make opening the window extremely difficult.



Curtains: The ac curtains are the pieces on the side that slide to cover up the gaps to prevent outside air from getting in. These should be secured into the window and not leave any openings. If you have a window where the screens don't completely cover, consider buying new ones or using a solid material to cover the gap that can't be secured.




Top mounting rail: On the top of the ac unit is a mounting rail that once the window is closed, prevents it from falling out.  Depending on your model it may come with predrilled holes to screw it in. If not create your own.


Alarm: A stand alone window alarm can be purchased for relatively cheap and if the window is opened will create an audible alarm.




Crime prevention stickers: If you have an alarm on your house or on your window, place an ample amount of stickers on your windows indicating this.

Please let us know if there are any other ways you secure yours below!




Friday, June 2, 2017

Knowing your employees


Great article by Law Officer. Charlesbrook Protection Services, LLC has great success because of the relationship between command staff and our officers. Investing time and forming genuine relationships with employees is key to maintaining a healthy work environment.
"Several years ago, I attended a very beneficial leadership course.  One of the things that I took away from that class that I still do today is knowing your officers.  The instructor encouraged us to get some index cards and a recipe box (yes this was before smart phones) to capture important information about each one of our staff members.
You can use the old style index cards and recipe box, or enter the data into your smart phone.  Regardless of what you use, it is important to capture this information to gain respect and trust.
Information of your staff that you should capture:
  • Name of spouse
  • Name of children
  • Name of grandchildren
  • Name of parents
  • Birthdates
  • Anniversaries
  • Hobbies and special interests
  • Favorite sports teams
  • Goals (professional and personal)
  • Anything else you feel important to enhance your professional and personal relationship
It is important that when talking to your staff formally or informally, you should talk to them about some of these topics.  More importantly, you need to be genuinely interested when mentioning these topics.  Just talking about something of interest to strike up a conversation without being genuine is not as productive in your relationship building as really being interested.
Instead of asking, “How is your wife and kids?”  Ask, “How is Shannon and Tim doing?”  It is much more personable when using names rather than titles.  When you demonstrate a true interest in your entire staff, they will feel valued and you should see an increase in morale.
Dallas Sergeant Keith Wenzel (ret) made it a practice each year to send each spouse of the those that worked for him, a personal letter.  He addressed the family by name and made sure they knew who he was and had his phone number.  You can never underestimate in showing a personal interest in those that work for you and Wenzel saw the benefits of that.
Listen
One of the key components of gathering your staff’s information is having exceptional listening skills.  We are bombarded with so much information and technology in today’s society and often times, our listening skills are diminished.  Our minds are always processing information when people are talking to us.  Taking a deep breath and concentrating on listening when our staff is talking to us is critical.
Put the phone down, get off of Facebook, and listen!
If it is important to your staff to talk to you, it should be important for you to listen intently to them.
Summary
You do not need to be in a leadership position to capture and use this information.  This works up the chain as well as down the chain.  Gather this information on your Sergeant, Captain, etc.  Strike up a conversation with your lieutenant and ask him how Tim is doing in football or how was Julie’s first day of school.  I’m sure your relationship with your Lieutenant will be a valued relationship.
Working with others that have a great bond no matter what the rank is makes for a much more productive and cohesive work environment.  Your goal should be to maintain a healthy and genuine connection with each person you work with.  Continuously and intentionally go out of your way to strengthen and develop your relationship with your co-workers. You will not be disappointed!  You may be very surprised and gain a new fishing buddy!"

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Tips for staying safe at an event

In the aftermath of the bombing at Manchester Arena last week — which killed 22 people and wounded 116 others — venue operators, live event producers, and law enforcement groups around the world are rethinking their approaches to event security.

The below article written by Buzz Feeds, Reggie Ugwu are some great tips on staying safe at major events. 


ISIS claimed responsibility for the bombing, which targeted an Ariana Grande concert in the northern England city of Manchester on May 22. UK Prime Minister Theresa May described it as "among the worst terrorist incidents we have ever experienced." Today, Grande announced that she will return to the city on Sunday, June 4, for a benefit show, which will also feature performances by Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Coldplay, Pharrell, Miley Cyrus, and others.
Leon Neal / Getty Images
ISIS claimed responsibility for the bombing, which targeted an Ariana Grande concert in the northern England city of Manchester on May 22. UK Prime Minister Theresa May described it as "among the worst terrorist incidents we have ever experienced." Today, Grande announced that she will return to the city on Sunday, June 4, for a benefit show, which will also feature performances by Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Coldplay, Pharrell, Miley Cyrus, and others.

The big challenge: The Manchester bombing took place in a "gray zone" between the arena and a train station, which had a lot of foot traffic but less security than at either location.


Since 9/11, security procedures at big venues like Manchester Arena have been routinely upgraded. Safety measures including bollards (those stout metal poles that block vehicles), metal detectors, high-resolution security cameras, and numerous security guards and off-duty police officers are now standard. But incidents like the Manchester bombing — and a bombing outside of a soccer stadium during the 2015 Paris attacks — indicate a need to expand the security perimeter around big events, security experts said. "It’s no longer just the venue anymore — it’s the surroundings that are just as important," Louis Marciani, director of the National Center for Spectator Sports Safety and Security, told BuzzFeed News.
Dave Thompson / Getty Images
Since 9/11, security procedures at big venues like Manchester Arena have been routinely upgraded. Safety measures including bollards (those stout metal poles that block vehicles), metal detectors, high-resolution security cameras, and numerous security guards and off-duty police officers are now standard. 
But incidents like the Manchester bombing — and a bombing outside of a soccer stadium during the 2015 Paris attacks — indicate a need to expand the security perimeter around big events, security experts said. "It’s no longer just the venue anymore — it’s the surroundings that are just as important," Louis Marciani, director of the National Center for Spectator Sports Safety and Security, told BuzzFeed News.

In the future, security experts say they expect these kinds of peripheral areas to be more heavily guarded — a change that will require increased cooperation between private businesses and local authorities, and make the experience of attending live events a little more demanding.


In addition to making the access to events more tedious, added security could lead to higher ticket prices to cover costs. "Just like when we stopped allowing liquids on planes, and started requiring you to take your shoes off at the airport, it’s a nuisance, but it’s a necessary nuisance," said Manuel Gomez of MG Security Services. "As these things evolve, we evolve with them."Whatever form new security measures take, experts said they are likely to be implemented quietly. "A promoter or venue will never say, 'Because of Bataclan we're doing X,' or 'Because of Manchester we're doing Y,' because they don't want to worry people," said Steve Adelman, vice president of the Entertainment Safety Alliance. Multiple promoters contacted by BuzzFeed News declined to comment.
Oli Scarff / AFP / Getty Images
In addition to making the access to events more tedious, added security could lead to higher ticket prices to cover costs. 
"Just like when we stopped allowing liquids on planes, and started requiring you to take your shoes off at the airport, it’s a nuisance, but it’s a necessary nuisance," said Manuel Gomez of MG Security Services. "As these things evolve, we evolve with them."
Whatever form new security measures take, experts said they are likely to be implemented quietly. "A promoter or venue will never say, 'Because of Bataclan we're doing X,' or 'Because of Manchester we're doing Y,' because they don't want to worry people," said Steve Adelman, vice president of the Entertainment Safety Alliance. 
Multiple promoters contacted by BuzzFeed News declined to comment.

If you're at an arena or other venue and something alarming happens, experts say there are things you can do to help keep yourself and your friends safe.



Mike Hewitt / Getty Images

Here are some precautions for the safety-conscious ticket holder, according to security professionals:

Before the Event / When You Arrive:

1. Review the seating chart and familiarize yourself with the layout of the venue and the location of your seat. You may want to download the chart to your phone. 
2. Do a search online to see if the event or performers have been a target of violent threats.
3. Check the venue's website to see if there's information posted about its security efforts.
4. Parents: Consider requiring adult supervision for kids and teenagers.
5. With the rest of your party, think ahead about what your game plan will be in the event of an emergency: What will you do? How will you communicate? Where will you go?
6. When you get to the venue, keep an eye out for the emergency exit closest to your seat — just like on an airplane.
7. Take note of where event staff or security/police officers are posted.
8. Keep an eye out for a potential "safe room" near your seat — a closet or other windowless room with a door that locks — where you can hide if necessary.
9. If you see someone acting strangely or in a way that makes you uncomfortable, notify event staff or security/police officers.

If There's an Emergency:

10. Take cover and listen for any announcements. 
11. See if you can identify the location of the threat(s) based on crowd reactions and get out of the way of immediate harm.
12. Put your game plan into action. If you need to escape the venue, calmly and quickly make your way toward the nearest exit — not the entrance you came in.
13. If there's an armed attack and you can't escape quickly, head to a safe room, lock the door, turn out the lights, and stay silent. "If [the attacker] has to make extra effort to get into a room, they might just bypass it," said Jeff Ringel, a security analyst with The Soufan Group and a former leader of the FBI's emergency response team.
14. Keep your group together and help each other out.
15. If you get caught up in a stampede, move away from the center and grab onto a wall or pillar for safety.
16. Stay away from glass that could shatter and cause injuries. 
17. But if other exits are blocked, be prepared to break a window or escape by alternative means.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Dangers That Go Easily Unnoticed

American businesses today are susceptible to some of the scariest security breaches and threats imaginable. Mainly because they often do not have the knowledge or resources to secure their property properly. With advancements in technology and industries forming to combat these problems, you do have options for defense, but they can come at a hefty price. Many businesses can make their facilities more secure by fixing some errors (for free) that often go unnoticed. Today lets focus on one commonly overlooked security risk here in America, which is “access control/key management.”

Different industries require different levels of access management, but in any industry, keeping people out of unauthorized locations should be a top priority. Technology advancements such as “D.A.C.S (Door Access Control Systems)” make securing sensitive locations easy, but these are often unaffordable for the average business owner. If your facility is using traditional keys to gain access to secure locations, you can still easily manage access to these restricted areas.

Creating a key log is the best way to do this. Within the log include the employee's name and title. Then assign keys only to areas that this employee will need access to. Label the keys to these designated areas and issue them to the employee. By doing this you avoid the potential of presenting a employee with unecessary opportunities to violate company policies and/or the law. Businesses could potentially avoid problems by not using the “one key is easiest” mentality. I have been in large facilities that have only required 2 keys to gain access to virtually everything within the building. This offers incredible potential for crime to occur.

Next, regularly update this list. This list should be updated every time an employee changes positions, resigns/fired, or quits. This prevents an employee or ex-employee from gaining access into areas that they shouldn’t be in. Along with this point, do not allow employees to take keys home. Request that they sign their keys out at the beginning of their shift and sign them back in at the end of their shift. This prevents the keys from getting lost, stolen, key duplicates being made, and after hour breaches.

The last way to secure your building using proper access control techniques is to ponder what could happen if a “bad guy” enters your facility. Discuss with your leadership team what might happen if someone gets through the front door and by the front desk personnel. Where are they going to go? Could they easily gain access to the rest of the facility? These questions will allow you to create a safer environment for your clients, employees, and yourself.

A flawless access control plan is impossible to create, but noticing problems and making  changes is a great first step. Businesses are often reactive when it comes to securing their facility. Proactive readiness will allow you to be a step ahead of those who attempt to do harm. The gains are priceless when it comes down to the safety of the lives that you serve and employee.

Next week we will discuss employee safety dangers.  

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

What you will need to save your life in a winter emergency.

 

How to Make a Winter Survival Kit
Everyone should carry a Winter Survival Kit in their car. In an emergency, it could save your life and the lives of your passengers. Here is what you need. According the State of Wisconsin, here is what you'll need:
  • a shovel
  • windshield scraper and small broom
  • flashlight with extra batteries
  • battery powered radio
  • water
  • snack food including energy bars
  • raisins and mini candy bars
  • matches and small candles
  • extra hats, socks and mittens 
  • First aid kit with pocket knife
  • Necessary medications
  • blankets or sleeping bag
  • tow chain or rope
  • road salt, sand, or cat litter for traction
  • booster cables
  • emergency flares and reflectors
  • fluorescent distress flag and whistle to attract attention
  • Cell phone adapter to plug into lighter




Kit tips:
  • Store items in the passenger compartment in case the trunk is jammed or frozen shut.
  • Choose small packages of food that you can eat hot or cold.
911 tips:
  • If possible, call 911 on your cell phone. Provide your location, condition of everyone in the vehicle and the problem you're experiencing.
  • Follow instructions: you may be told to stay where you are until help arrives.
  • Do not hang up until you know who you have spoken with and what will happen next.
  • If you must leave the vehicle, write down your name, address, phone number and destination. Place the piece of paper inside the front windshield for someone to see.
Survival tips:
  • Prepare your vehicle: Make sure you keep your gas tank at least half full.
  • Be easy to find: Tell someone where you are going and the route you will take.
  • If stuck: Tie a florescent flag (from your kit) on your antenna or hang it out the window. At night, keep your dome light on. Rescue crews can see a small glow at a distance. To reduce battery drain, use emergency flashers only if you hear approaching vehicles. If you're with someone else, make sure at least one person is awake and keeping watch for help at all times. 
  • Stay in your vehicle: Walking in a storm can be very dangerous. You might become lost or exhausted. Your vehicle is a good shelter.
  • Avoid Overexertion: Shoveling snow or pushing your car takes a lot of effort in storm conditions. Don't risk a heart attack or injury. That work can also make you hot and sweaty. Wet clothing loses insulation value, making you susceptible to hypothermia.
  • Fresh Air: It's better to be cold and awake than comfortably warm and sleepy. Snow can plug your vehicle's exhaust system and cause deadly carbon monoxide gas to enter your car. Only run the engine for 10 minutes an hour and make sure the exhaust pipe is free of snow. Keeping a window open a crack while running the engine is also a good idea.
  • Don't expect to be comfortable: You want to survive until you're found.

Monday, October 24, 2016


Click the link to see the the Wood TV 8 story.

http://woodtv.com/2016/06/03/life-after-war-marine-and-combat-dog-working-together-again/


GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — This is a story of man and man’s best friend — one best told through pictures from the battlefield.
That’s where Marine Cpl. Jeff DeYoung and his bomb-sniffing, life-saving partner Cena became best pals.
The pair teamed up to seek out explosives in Afghanistan back in 2009.
“He cleared the roads, he found the IEDs, he cleared routes and everything and kept us safe,” DeYoung said of Cena. “During firefights, I would have to lay on top of him over myself because he’s a more valuable asset than I was.”
DeYoung and Cena were split up in 2010. It wasn’t until four years later when they finally saw each other again. Their reunion made national headlines, and they have been inseparable ever since.
But like so many of those who serve, DeYoung, a Jenison graduate, struggled to find his footing after returning home from war. Employers were hesitant to allow him to bring to Cena to work.
Not Charlesbrook Protection Services.  The small security company has allowed DeYoung the chance to work alongside Cena yet again.
“When he got out of the military, he really didn’t feel like he fit in anywhere,” Charlesbrook CEO Ryan Woodford said. “He went from a few companies to a few companies, and was just overwhelmingly grateful that we were going to give him what he needed — which was very minimal stuff.”
DeYoung, who has PTSD, now shares his story to advocate for other veterans. He has become a military ambassador for the American Humane Association.
He speaks at events to advocate for veterans rights — especially for veterans in the workplace — and for those who have special needs, like a service dog.
“It’s not so much as hiring a person with a pet. You’re just hiring a stronger team member,” DeYoung said.
As for Cena, he’s now nine years old. Save for a limp, he gets around all right. How many years he has left is anyone’s guess — but you can be sure they will be spent alongside his best friend.
“We’ve had our bumps and bruises and wild rides. We’ve shared fighting holes in places that people can’t spell. But I wouldn’t trade it for anything. And I wouldn’t trade our days for anything,” DeYoung said. -Evan Dean 

Thursday, August 11, 2016

How to make my business safer- Doors (part 1)

Thank you for taking time to read our blog. Our blog series “how to make my business safer” will continue this week with the topic of doors. Doors are a complex issue and will be broken up over several posts.  A door can be a very vulnerable point for any structure to get broken into. Doors were designed for people to get into a building, we just want to control which people get in.

WINDOWS-

Let’s start with the type of door you select. We think of several different elements when we select doors and often times, looks and styling usually take priority.  One of those elements of style is windows within the door. Windows have lots of benefits, just not when it comes to making your business safer. Windows in doors should be avoided at all cost. However, you are going to select a door that has a window, ensure that the window is placed high in the door. Ensure that it is small enough that if the window got broken someone can not reach the lock or enter through the opening. We would also recommend that the glass is designed that someone looking in is unable to get a clear picture of what is inside. Buy tamper resistant glass if available. 

MATERIAL-

The quality of the door material and its density should not be overlooked. Most doors are either wood, steel or fiberglass. Solid wood doors are expensive and fiberglass often has limitations.  Steel is an overall great option, lower priced than other materials, lower maintenance and provides you protection. There are variety of styles and options to pick from.  When buying a steel door, the gauge of the steel is very important.  The lower the number the thicker the steel. 24 gauge is common at big box stores selling a low end/discount doors. This is not sufficient for security and you should look for a lower number.

NEXT WEEK-


We hope you feel more informed when selecting a door to help make your business safer. Next week we will talk about locks, hinges, strike plates and installation techniques. To see more updates, like our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/charlesbrookprotection/